Client News Coverage

The NASCAR Foundation Has Chosen Dunedin's Carl Flatley as Finalist for Betty Jane France Humanitarian Award

Posted in Client News Coverage on Wednesday, November 18, 2015.

The NASCAR Foundation has chosen Dunedin's Carl Flatley, the founder of Sepsis Alliance, as one of four finalists for the foundation's Betty Jane France Humanitarian Award presented by Nationwide. Flatley founded the alliance after his daughter lost her life to sepsis, a complication that occurs after an infection. Learn more about the reward at carlspitcrew.com.

Tampa Bay Times »

Beyond Words: Terminology Management's Role In Meaningful Use

Posted in Client News Coverage on Thursday, November 12, 2015.

As a faocal point of national quality initiatives, meaningful use (MU) is unfolding across the industry as a startegic effort to increase the momentum of health information exchange (HIE). The initiative accomplishes this goal by progressively laying a foundation of attestation requirements for the collection, exchange, and reporting of data using certified EHR technology (CEHRT).

For The Record Magazine »

The Role of Content Management in Ebola Response

Posted in Client News Coverage on Tuesday, July 07, 2015.

Standardization of evidence-based practices is a central goal of initiatives to improve population health, enhance patient experiences and lower costs.

While the ability to reduce variation in clinical response is an important component to reaching these goals, it is even more critical in the case of a public health crisis when time for disease containment is of the essence.

Health Data Management »

Same-Day Billing: Putting the 'management' in revenue cycle management

Posted in Client News Coverage on Wednesday, June 10, 2015.

Under the burden of new regulations and pay-for-performance initiatives to curb costs, hospitals' and healthcare networks' financial systems must find more efficient routes to cut time-to-bill for procedures and diagnostic care. The faster the procedure is coded and billed, the faster the facility is paid. However, despite best efforts, many organizations still struggle to turn around coding and billing in a timely manner. Delays can range from coding to the more severe issue of rejected or denied claims, which prevent payment from occurring in a reasonable timeframe, negatively impacting overall revenues.

Executive Insight »

Is Mobile the Answer to Closed-Loop Dictation?

Posted in Client News Coverage on Wednesday, May 13, 2015.

HIT and mobile technology have finally come to a crossroad. The mobile industry has reached a point where experimenting with HIT integration is feasible, proven, and affordable. Cost barriers such as application hardware and software and design complexity that once prevented developers from exploring mobile integration have been minimized.

For The Record »

Common Medical Billing Errors

Posted in Client News Coverage on Tuesday, March 31, 2015.

Everyone makes mistakes. It’s a natural part of life. But when it comes to medical billing and coding errors, one mistake can mean thousands of dollars in mismanaged costs for both a physician and a patient. A shocking 8 out of 10 hospital bills contain errors, as reported by ABC News. Medical billing errors might mean that a patient is billed for too much or too little of their treatment cost. Medical coding errors might mean that a patient’s treatment is coded as a procedure that is not covered by insurance, so they are left with a hefty bill.

Top Medical Assisting Programs »

Everyone makes mistakes. It’s a natural part of life. But when it comes to medical billing and coding errors, one mistake can mean thousands of dollars in mismanaged costs for both a physician and a patient. A shocking 8 out of 10 hospital bills contain errors, as reported by ABC News. Medical billing errors might mean that a patient is billed for too much or too little of their treatment cost. Medical coding errors might mean that a patient’s treatment is coded as a procedure that is not covered by insurance, so they are left with a hefty bill.   - See more at: http://www.topmedicalassistingprograms.com/blog/common-medical-billing-errors#sthash.XxZCLtMQ.dpuf
Everyone makes mistakes. It’s a natural part of life. But when it comes to medical billing and coding errors, one mistake can mean thousands of dollars in mismanaged costs for both a physician and a patient. A shocking 8 out of 10 hospital bills contain errors, as reported by ABC News. Medical billing errors might mean that a patient is billed for too much or too little of their treatment cost. Medical coding errors might mean that a patient’s treatment is coded as a procedure that is not covered by insurance, so they are left with a hefty bill.   - See more at: http://www.topmedicalassistingprograms.com/blog/common-medical-billing-errors#sthash.XxZCLtMQ.dpuf

Ebola Epidemic Highlights the Need for ICD-10

Posted in Client News Coverage on Wednesday, February 18, 2015.

When the first U.S. Ebola patient was admitted to a Dallas hospital in the summer of 2014, the ensuing media firestorm scrutinized nearly every aspect of the U.S. healthcare system’s readiness to deal with an epidemic that had already left thousands dead and dying overseas.

ICD10 Monitor »

Speeding Sepsis Response by Integrating Key Technology

Posted in Client News Coverage on Tuesday, January 27, 2015.

Three-week-old Jose Carlos Romero-Herrera was rushed to the ER, lethargic and unresponsive with a fever of 102.3. His mother watched helplessly as doctors, nurses, respiratory therapists and assorted other clinicians frantically worked to determine what was wrong with an infant who just 24 hours earlier had been healthy and happy.

EMR & HIPPA »

Dual Coding: Shifting Focus To Root Operations

Posted in Client News Coverage on Tuesday, January 20, 2015.

As more hospitals undertake dual coding in advance of ICD-10, evidence is emerging that suggests clinical documentation may not be the only weak link in the transition. Many are discovering that coders are struggling with the correct selection of the 31 PCS root operations. Dual coding programs are highlighting for many facilities the significant need for advanced PCS training, especially in cardiovascular, muscular skeletal, and obstetrics. A recent pilot undertaken by Amphion revealed more than half of the surgical procedure code errors were attributed to the incorrect selection of the “root operation.

Health IT Outcomes »

Intersection of ICD-10 and Meaningful Use: Clinical Documentation Improvement

Posted in Client News Coverage on Tuesday, January 06, 2015.

As hospitals, health systems and payers navigate the new risk-bearing landscape, synergies exist when clinical documentation improvement strategies are expanded to address both meaningful use (MU) SNOMED CT requirements and ICD-10. While the magnitude of the ICD-10 transition itself and the ongoing rumors of additional delays may tempt some organizations to pause in their pursuit of readiness, the bottom line is that advantages to clinical documentation can be realized even before the transition by using SNOMED CT within electronic health records.

Government Health IT »

Transcription Gaps Pose Problems

Posted in Client News Coverage on Tuesday, October 21, 2014.

Are health care organizations paying proper attention to the caliber of their transcribed documents?

Although medical record privacy is always a concern, some patients may be surprised by who isn’t looking at their files. Most consumers probably expect that their medical records are reviewed for accuracy, but that’s not always the case.

For the Record »

Readers Write: Digital Patient Engagement Tools to Achieve “Top Box” Medication-Related HCAHPS Scores

Posted in Client News Coverage on Tuesday, October 21, 2014.

Improving HCAHPS performance is a never-ending struggle for hospitals, one that has taken on greater urgency as results are linked to CMS’s Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) program. The HCAHPS Survey is the basis of the “Patient Experience of Care Domain” under VPB, which makes up 30 percent of a facility’s total performance score.

A particularly thorny problem has been improving patient communications regarding medication, which is measured based on HCAHPS responses to three questions:

  1. Before giving you any new medicine, how often did hospital staff tell you what the medicine was for?
  2. Before giving you any new medicine, how often did hospital staff describe possible side effects in a way you could understand?
  3. When I left the hospital, I clearly understood the purpose for taking each of my medication

HIStalk »

6 Prescription Mistakes You’re Making

Posted in Client News Coverage on Thursday, October 09, 2014.

It’s hard to imagine a time when there wasn’t a pill—sometimes dozens of different ones—to treat so many health conditions. Today, 70% of Americans take at least one prescription drug and more than half take two, according to the Mayo Clinic.

While the healing powers of modern medicine are pretty awesome, you still need to be cautious when it comes to any drug. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reports that medication errors cause at least one death every day and injure 1.3 million people annually.

Health.com »

Data Integrity and HIOs: The Top Five Most Dangerous Practices, and Five Steps to Stop Them

Posted in Client News Coverage on Tuesday, September 30, 2014.

The convergence of advanced health information technologies, a greater focus on collaborative care and population health management, and a growing federal focus on initiatives driven by wide-spread information sharing has given rise to the health information exchange organization (HIO). While the benefits of HIOs are numerous and significant (e.g., point of care access to accurate patient information for improved care management and coordination; streamlined clinical workflows; enhanced organizational efficiencies), maintaining data integrity is a particularly thorny challenge.

Advance Healthcare Network »

Optimizing Sepsis Treatment: A National Leader’s Perspective

Posted in Client News Coverage on Thursday, September 25, 2014.

Sometimes referred to as blood poisoning, sepsis is the body’s often-deadly response to infection. As many as 1.6 million Americans are affected by sepsis, and more than 258,000 of them die from it, every year. Yet sepsis remains not only misunderstood by the public—a recent study by Harris Poll on behalf of the Sepsis Alliance in June 2014 found that only 44 percent of Americans had even heard of sepsis—it also remains challenging for physicians and other clinicians to work with. There are a variety of reasons that sepsis remains such a huge, unmanaged problem, in hospitals and emergency departments. But there are those who are working to change the situation. And there are things that IT professionals, especially clinical informaticists, can do, to turn things around.

Healthcare Informatics »